Triple pork mazemen w/ roasted garlic & pea tips

What’s better than double pork? Triple pork. Or more than triple pork, perhaps. I don’t know. I don’t want to be a… pig.

I wasn’t very much into ramen when I was growing up because my only experience with it was the prepackaged store-bought stuff which literally tasted like salt noodles. Because of my distaste for those, I never ordered anything with ramen in it or thought to give it a try myself, even with fresher ingredients.

So far, we’ve had two ramen dishes through Blue Apron. I like them. Wife likes them. You might even say, “Everybody Loves Ramen.”

Robert_Barone

Or you might not say that, because you are more of a Robert and you do not love Ramen.

This dish promises pork three ways: pork, bacon and a sauce made up from a combination of those two. At least I think that’s where the “triple” is coming from, because there’s only two pork ingredients listed. But whether it’s really double or triple, if you’ve got a pork lover in your home, they’re going to enjoy this.

A couple of notes if you’re trying this at home and don’t know where to find certain thing or are looking for substitutions:

  • Mirin is a rice wine. If you can find it or some other kind of rice wine, congratulations! Go home and make this! But for those of you who panic around the store, stop panicking. As a substitute, you can just add 2 teaspoons of sugar to 1/8 cup of whine wine, vermouth or dry sherry, and you’ve got all you need for this dish.
  • If you can’t find pea tips, you’re not alone. I’ve never seen them, and I sometimes shop in a pretentious store that only plays classical music or opera. If they don’t have it, no one has it. But, if you need to sub this out, you could try spinach or even bok choy.
  • For the spices, Blue Apron wants you to use kibbled nori. If you’re at a loss for this, you should be able to find this in your grocery with the Asian ingredients. If you can’t find this specifically, grab some nori paper, which is just seafood sheets used for rolling sushi. Chop some of it up for this recipe, then save the rest of the nori to make homemade sushi and impress your friends!

What did you think of this one? Does “Everybody Love Ramen” in your house too? Should I stop trying to make that pun a thing in 2016? Comment below or on the Facebook page, unless you’re that spambot on the Facebook page that keeps telling me that all of my posts make you happy and wonder if they make everyone else as happy, inexplicably followed by a smirky emoji. That’s getting weird.


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Recipe courtesy of Blue Apron
Serves 3
Blue Apron calories: About 560
My Fitness Pal calories: 521

10 Ounces Ground Pork
1 Slice Bacon
¾ Pound Fresh Ramen Noodles
1 Ounce Pea Tips
1 Bunch Garlic Chives
2 Tablespoons Pork Demi-Glace
2 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
2 Tablespoons Mirin
1 Head Garlic
1 1-Inch Piece Ginger
½ Teaspoon Pork Mazemen Spice Blend (Black Sesame Seeds, White Sesame Seeds, Kibbled Nori & Smoked Paprika)

Preheat the oven to 475°F. Cut off and discard the top of the garlic head to expose the cloves, keeping the rest of the head as intact as possible. Place on a piece of aluminum foil; drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Tightly wrap the seasoned garlic head in the foil. Place on a sheet pan and roast 28 to 30 minutes, or until the cloves are browned and very tender. Remove from the oven and carefully unwrap; set aside to cool slightly.

While the garlic roasts, wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a medium pot of salted water to boiling on high. Peel and mince the ginger. Thinly slice the garlic chives. Roughly chop any large pea tips. Small dice the bacon.

While the garlic continues to roast, in a large pot, heat 1 teaspoon of olive oil on medium until hot. Add the bacon and cook, stirring occasionally, 3 to 4 minutes, or until browned and crispy.

Add the ginger and all but a big pinch of the garlic chives to the pot of bacon; cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened and fragrant. Add the ground pork; season with salt and pepper. Cook, frequently breaking the meat apart with a spoon, 4 to 5 minutes, or until lightly browned and cooked through; season with salt and pepper. Turn off the heat.

When cool enough to handle, using your hands, gently squeeze the individual cloves out of the roasted garlic head; discard the skins. To the pot of bacon, aromatics and ground pork, add the roasted garlic cloves, soy sauce, mirin,demi-glace and 1 cup of water; stir to thoroughly combine. Heat to boiling on high. Once boiling, reduce the heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until the liquid is slightly reduced in volume.

While the sauce simmers, add the noodles to the medium pot of boiling water, gently stirring to separate; cook 2 to 3 minutes, or until tender. Drain thoroughly and transfer to the pot of sauce; cook, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the noodles are thoroughly coated. Turn off the heat. Stir in the pea tips; season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide ⅔ of the finished mazemen between 2 bowls (you will have extra). Garnish with the remaining garlic chives and as much of the spice blend as you’d like. Enjoy!

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